The Big Book of Gross Stuff

A hilarious look at science, nature, and the human body!

From boogers, B.O., and belches to sneezes, diseases, and demon cheeses — The Big Book of Gross Stuff has it all! This book is chock-full of practical knowledge, including a Gross Quiz (see how you stack up against the rest of society), and the World’s Most Disgusting Jobs (royal butt wiper, anyone?)

Written with an elegant wit, this book also offers an array of cool words and phrases that will have you bending and sending, blowing soup, and gargling gravy all the way to the bathroom!

Reviews

“These pages are packed solid with disgusting information on an array of topics… King includes many historical anecdotes and interesting bits of gross trivia (did you know that the Apollo 11 astronauts left their defecation collection devices on the moon?) … The irreverent writing style is frequently laugh-out-loud funny and full of puns. Kids will love the euphemisms for various bodily functions and the sidebars (one has a recipe for making fake snot)… This book is not for the faint of heart . . . there are certainly middle-school kids who will eat it up.” —School Library Journal


“We were happy to find The Big Book of Gross Stuff. To summarize: It’s a book. It’s big. It’s full of gross stuff. That means definitions, history, stories, fun facts and, of course, illustrations. Everything you could possibly want to know about everything gross … and then some. We can see this book as the kind of thing you’d bring to a sleepover party to giggle over, or as a place to find topics for a school report or science experiment. At the very least, it’s something you’ll probably read a bit of, then stop and read that bit aloud to the nearest person, because they just have to hear it. Our rating: A.” —PBSKids.org, The “It’s My Life” Blog


“Most people agree that the 8-to 12-year-old set enters a phase when many things unmentionable and almost all things scatological are infinitely intriguing… Parents of young readers realize that ‘Ewww, gross!’ is a big compliment. With this in mind… The Big Book of Gross Stuff offers us something new. Bart King embraces this fascination and presents a meticulous scale by which readers can classify their tolerance for grossness.” —Brandy Allport, 
The Florida Times-Union


“EEW! ICK! COOL! Burp. Sneeze. Sniff your armpits and pick your nose. Miss Manners might not approve, but you’ll be right in sync with The Big Book of Gross Stuff. Author Bart King specializes in ‘stealth science,’ taking on messy topics that adolescent boys adore — and explaining the facts behind them in a clear and entertaining way. Booger basics, anyone?” —Mary Colurso, The Birmingham News


“Bart King…is a master at presenting yucky stuff with humor and teachable moments found in history, science and the whole wide world.” —Fran Hawk, The Post and Courier


“The Portland [author] who really ‘gets’ kids brings it again, this time with a side of slime. The book is full of tween—boy appeal, with info like ‘World’s Most Disgusting Jobs’ (whale feces researcher?), a gross quiz and loads more. Fascinating fun!” —Kristen Russell Dobson, ParentMap.com


“The Big Book of Gross Stuff provides a multitude of ‘Hey—listen—to—this’ factoids and plenty of belly laughs for readers who like to dip into wacky (but educational) reading.” —Books for Kids Blog


“This is a hilarious book about science, nature and the human body.” —Pop! Canada’s Adventure Magazine for Kids


“Bart King is a lot like Bill Nye the Science Guy. He teaches kids and immature adults about science and the human body, but King takes it to a whole new level—a new and disgusting level.” —The Daily Vanguard


“My son rolls off the school bus telling fart jokes while my husband has an application called iFart on his phone. I’m pretty sure they’re the target market for The Big Book of Gross Stuff.” —Katie Schneider, The Oregonian


‘Sometimes it’s hard to get tweens to read. For those not afraid to brave the unmentionable [this engaging book] will… get tweens laughing while burying their noses deep into the pages.” —Examiner.com